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of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
in the foreign policy in the president's speech. how did you characterize this president's approach to foreign policy? >> i think he doesn't want to deal with it, frankly. a lot of people in this country would agree with him. i think this administration would much rather focus on guns and taxes and other social issues and not deal with the quagmire that is the middle east. the bush years were deep in iraq and afghanistan trying to get between the sunni and shia fight and i think this administration would rather not deal with it. sounds great, but i don't think that's an option because the foreign policy and the rest of the world comes knocking on your door and the way things are heading right now while we would like to ignore it or not i don't think we'll be able to. >> nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel, always good to see you. the invitation is open. i know you're not stateside much, but when you are, come back. >> i look forward to. >> now to what could shape up to be the senate race in 2014, the battle in kentucky. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell will be making a bid fo
of transition for american foreign policy as senator john kerry faces a high-stakes job interview to be the secretary of state. kerry's confirmation hearings were rather cordial hosted by the foreign relations committee which he's led for the past four years. but it was an unexpected moment when the hearings were interrupted by a protester that offered perhaps the most telling revelation about the man and the moment. >> i'm tired of my friends dying. i don't know if they're going to be alive the next day. >> when i first came to washington and testified, i obviously was testifying as part of a group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about. people measure what we do. >> kerry's confirmation hearing today comes a day after secretary hillary clinton stood her ground offering a robust defense of her handling of those attacks in benghazi that killed four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. at wednesday's long-awaited hearings on benghazi, clinton took responsibility for security lapses but that obviously was not go
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
asked. t bigger question putting and placing benghazi scope of a broader failure of foreign policy. that's going to have to be what they are going to do if they are going to talk about chuck hagel is highlight the the obama's failures in this area and talk about chuck hagel is going to be yes man for that strategy. if they are not able to do that in a hearing like this which they have been pressing for four months it does not bode well. >> paul: what about her overall tenure at state? is there anything you can point to fall of qaddafi, that's now taken a negative term. there was an arm's control deal withe russia. you were not enamored of, as i recall. overall, what's her legacy? i mean, she is one of the most traveled secretaries of state. she did the public diplomacy part of her job to her credit well. she was sort of a very famous figure who went to many countries, in terms of her influence on obama policy or much less any sort of achievement it is impossible, at least to me to point to anything. what was even more remarkable about those hearings is that she sounded very hawkish on am
role in helping the president shape some of the big foreign policy decisions that have come out of this white house, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, responding to some of the national -- or natural, rather, disasters that have occurred during president obama's tenure, including japan, haiti, and you remember he was pictured in the situation room after the raid on osama bin laden, so this is someone with whom president obama has worked for quite some time. he has a good working relationship with white house staffers, and just a little bit of biographical information, alex. he lives with his wife and three kids in maryland. he is one of 11 kids himself. president obama coming out right now to announce this new appointment, chief of staff dennis mcdonough. >> thank you, kristen. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody, and welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president i rely on an extraordinary team of men and women here at the white house every
mean, there are some big foreign policy issuehas that we're facing out there that didn't get touched you are right. vicki mentions egg legacy. piece of our time. which any written will remember as neville chamberlain's fame mutt comment coming back from the munich dealer hitler most begotten phrase whatsoever. it is astonishing to it me that that quote even is inadvertently and said in a different context slipped through the fact checkers and speech writerred and kno-ho-co in the mainstream media noted. >> i did. >> now there is "newsweek" magazine which is an online only publication i guess you would call it second coming. searches have long complained president obama thinks that of himself. now call they have made it official i guess. >> he was treated as messiah figure the first time around. the media put too much faith in politics and government it reflect their particular ideological bias. they really -- they are setting him up for a no fail secondin term. they are not going to hold him accountability didn't held him accountable in the. racist. viewer for the coverage of the "th
't be any more. kicked off the state's last night after bashing the president's foreign policy. here is just a bit of what happened. ♪ lou: i thought that was a rather -- went on for more than 30 minutes. thirty minutes. what he said or how long he took to say it. lupe fiasco has made headlines before. not two years ago he called the present the biggest terrorist. is sort of makes you wonder why he was invited to begin with. i thought it was kind of a catchy tune. up next in a gas prices and the national debt of nearly doubled. more than 20 million people remain out of work. what story? the "a-team" rejoins us or, if you will, an analysis of this administration first and second term prospects. monica crowley, michael goodwin, judith miller are back. stay with us. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choo any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. no
up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats in congress than any other time in the 20th century except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures related to gun violence. becau
any big imprints with foreign policy, what they tried to pursue like having everlasting peace in the middle east, you end up seeing a perspective from both hillary clinton and barack obama where they were trying to put out a lot of fires around the world in a very, very messy world. thank you very much. great pleasure having you on for two segments today. programming note, this wednesday see andrea mitchell's interview with secretary of state hillary clinton. that's at 1:00 eastern time on "andrea mitchell reports" right before our hour. >>> coming up -- >> a minority majority. >> a what? >> the minorities will be the majority. >> the minorities will be the majority. congresswoman nancy pelosi says in july hispanics will become the majority in her home state. how could the state's new minority majority impact the midterms and point the direction or the arrow to texas as well in this discussion. >>> plus, we'll get the latest on the nightclub fire in brazil that's taken the lives of more than 200 people. many of them under the age of 20 years old. we'll have details in the late
of weeks. joan walsh said they broke no news and provided little insight on the foreign policy but there's a remarkable comfort and chemistry between them. what did you think while watching the interview s? >> that's right. no news was broken but president obama did himself a great favor nominating hillary clinton as secretary of state, insulating himself from any sort of primary challenge. also did her a great favor by insulating her from the politics of the last four years. joe biden, i think, is going to be in the center of a lot of the big political fights over the next year and going to see his approval ratings probably take a beating. of course, playing kyoto say this isn't about 2016. what a fantastic launch for hillary clinton. should she decide to run. i think one of the things we have seen over the last elections is that the person who has some strong connection with a base who's a candidate almost drafted by the base does better. mitt romney didn't have that. john mccain didn't have that. i hazard to say i don't think biden has that either. any of the democrats i talked to alw
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
on jobs and on foreign policy, making america stronger in trade and national security. >> the way you talk it makes it sound as if we don't have a really divided congress. talking to people on both sides pretty much every day of my work day. >> nothing worthwhile is easy and every inch of ground the president has to gain. but a lot of wind at his back right now and i won't say he will do lay-ups, but this president delivered through his first term. he has been able to do a lot in the first term. the second term will be a good one. >> do you think we'll hear in the inauguration address that talks about that? will you hear -- they told us, unity and hopeful. that's about it. but do you think you will hear -- he will talk about reaching out an olive branch to republicans? >> this is a republican i have heard talk about the importance of america americans to step up. democracy is not a spectator sport. he needs all of us to be involved. all of us need to step up and play a role in the destiny of our country. in the end of the day, this is one of the greatest speakers we have seen in my generat
that existed in june of 2006 is considered success. and it is not. this continues to be a terrible foreign policy mistake. and now we are confronted with the question, how do we clean up the mess. >> senator obama knew he needed to have a presidential level of credibility in such hearings. republican senator marco rubio has been talking tough about benghazi for months. >> one of the narratives that the obama campaign has laid out, osama bin laden is dead, they e retreated. you start to say do they allow any story to emerge that counters that narrative. is that why they told us that benghazi was a popular uprising, because it ran counter to their campaign narrative. >> and so the pressure was on senator rubio to deliver to all his fans all the fire and brim stone they had a right to expect. he was not just facing the secretary of state, who took responsibility for what happened in benghazi. he was facing possibly the next democratic nominee for president. tonight, the marco rubio fans could not be more disappointed. >> one of the things that i'm more interested in exploring to you, how inf
ambitions. senator kerry took heat for president obama's foreign policy which he supports, but says time is running out for the regime. >> the president has made it definitive. we will do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon and i repeat here today, our policy is not containment. it is prevention. and the clock is ticking on our efforts to secure responsible compliance. >> i hope you would help me with because in your testimony you alluded to president obama's vision for the world and the two years i've been here, i've struggled to fully understand what that vision is. >> on syria, another hot spot they'll face, senator kerry and senator mccain, a democrat and republican, said every day that goes by, it gets worse, shep. >> shepard: he was also, senator kerry, put into position to defend another of the president's cabinet nominees. >> that's right. his nomination is not controversial. he's well-known and plenty of experience and so he's expected to be a shoe in. but senator chuck hagel, the nominee to be the next secretary of defense has taken some heat and tod
what i liked about the president's speech when it came to foreign policy and national security thing was his comment on the fact that we don't have to live with perpetual warfare for lives in decades. that could turn out to be one of the most important parts of the speech. we have national security and the defense budget, which i think is wildly out of control. it is a kind of old war budget for a very different era. and i hope that the president and the administration and republicans as well as democrats will take a good look at that. neil: didhe miss an opportunity to do so? i know all about broad visions any spell out some of the details, but this was an opportunity to say that i see the magnitude of our debt. i see the magnitude of our problems. i am not oblivious to this. i want us all to join hands and look at wa to mutually get this down to size without dividing our social classes. i don't know if that opportunity was seized on appropriately enough today. >> well, i think it was a different kind of speech. but this is a president who has cut spending. he wants to cut more. i w
of the attack. >> now, we're only days into the president's second term and already tough foreign policy challenges. and secretary clinton's testimony and reports that those who attacked the algerian gas complex, also in the benghazi attack and controversy over u.s. sending f-16's to egypt. former speaker of the house newt gingrich joins us, good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> greta: i want to start with the f-16's to egypt. there's a field that was struck in 2010 and just delivered now, why are we sending f-16's to egypt? >> well, we've had a very long military relationship with the egyptians, but i think with the new president, who clearly is a member of the muslim brotherhood, somebody who as recently as two or three years ago said that children should be be taught to hate jews, the jews were comparable to pigs and apes, i think that we should be reassessing the whole relationship. i really am doubtful that morsi and the muslim brotherhood are going to turn out to be reliable allies and i am very concerned that we seem to have a policy that's on autopilot so no matter what they do,
for foreign policy and has worked in the pentagon under the obama administration and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush and a contributor for us. rosa, right now, 50% of active duty personnel are women. they're not in combat positions. as we said, this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy for combat military occupational specialties. but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. we've got women out there in combat, we've got women fighting heroically in combat, we've got women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> well, first, i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of wom
on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example, on gun control, that's going to be very problematic for -- >> can i get back to shrummy? does it bother you your opinions are generally acceptable or do you prefer to be a maverick? >> i've been waiting for the country to come around. i thought it would. i think barack obama has done a brilliant job. i would say to john he keeps talking about the problems in the red states. the red states are becoming a shrinking part of america. the one thing boehner said that is true is the republican party is annihilating itself in terms of being able to win the presidency. because they are in a demographic death spiral with women, with hispanics, with african-americans, with young people, with gays. what happened with ronald re
state department and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're actually considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate -- >> clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> su
donough. he's seen as a top foreign policy adviser to the president. he would be obama's fifth chief of staff. >>> all right. feeling a little drowsy this morning? you're in good company. new research from harvard medical school finds about one-third of all workers just aren't getting enough sleep to work at peak efficiency. and that's costing u.s. companies more than $63 billion a year in lost productivity. richard lui is here with a drill down on third pun of the day, an eye-opening report. >> it is. and this is a sign of the times. >> i'm sorry. it's friday. >> not the puns but this. sleep pods are not a common sight at most businesses. with the cost of sleepy workers rising, the metro nap energy pod is becoming more popular. and devices like that. google has $13,000 lounges like that on its campus. now others are investing in sleep programs according to "the wall street journal." shuteye shortage has hit our capital, too. vice president biden had a 30-second blink during an obama speech while tim geithner fought the long blink with rapid fire right next to him. secretary of state hillary
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
an extraordinary run at it in terms of foreign policy. i think secretary clinton has supported the president. i think that's reestablished our standing around the world. i think they managed an exceedingly complex, fast moving and difficult situations in a very skilled manner. i think she gets high marks, soledad, both from republicans and democrats, and from the american people and internationally. >> so she talked about how hard it is on the spouse, and he talked about how hard it is on the staff. so i guess my question would be is bill clinton kind of over it? you've known him since you were 5 years old. he's been very supportive of president obama. critical, i think it's fair to say, but has he also moved on? or is the spouse always struggling? >> i think both made good points in terms of the spouse and the staff. i think that's understandable and true. but i think you have to go to president clinton's speech in charlotte, which i think was a pivotal moment in the obama re-election campaign. that was a powerful speech making the case for the president's re-election. so i think the answer is
off a foreign policy team to shape that as well that looks different. >> it does look different than the first term. it is about returning america home and defining what engagement looks like in a second term. he just got tax increases and he wants more revenue. if he can find a way to say i will cut sending in a big way and has the ability of splitting that republican coalition and he seems to be interested in doing. >> he was very close in the senate to the senator from oklahoma. if you spend 15 minutes with him as i did recently, he has ways to reduce spending on medicare that also improves service. the system is a mess. i think if i'm barack obama which obviously i'm not, but pafr ever we are in a bar and he's about to get inaugurated. >> would invite him to dinner about how to make medicare better and cheaper. >> here told us and tells a lot of people that's not who i am. i get a feeling the president is ready to get out of his comfort zone and reach out to democrats and republicans. >> there is this idea that the second term we have about a year and a half o
spending. this has been a big foreign policy week in washington. and i'm wondering, given what we've learned about al qaeda and its resurgence in north africa and just defense posture globally, david, do you have a sense of what ryan is thinking about defense spending these days? >> no, i don't, particularly with regard to ryan, but i think it's such an important point, gene, because the threat from northern africa alone, listen to secretary clinton's testimony beyond what went into the benghazi attack or what information was missed. the need to fortify our missions and installations and consulates and embassies around the globe. and to the extent that we're going to have an aggressive posture to deal with an al qaeda 3.0 around the globe or failing states, if that comes to pass in afghanistan, there are real concerns that a lot of people have about the united states right now. to say nothing of all of the costs related to our returning soldiers and the sort of care that they're going to need. >> you know, what's so fascinating, steve rattner, talking about the debate, i'm actuall
environmental extremism in the past and they will again. the conservative argument being these policies cost jobs, they make the u.s. less competitive against foreign markets. but you've got to wonder how big a fight, myra, are the republicans willing to get into on this? >> i thought it was a pretty aggressive speech from the president yesterday. his underlying premise in the speech was the economy's pretty much taken care of, i can move on to other issues like immigration, climate change and marriage. to his base, he's saying it's taken me four years to fix the economy. now i'm going to move on to some of your priorities. >> well, if that's what he's saying, is that how you heard it, margie? >> maybe i was watching a different channel. i saw a president who talked very specifically about openness and diversity and those are things that really we all share and it's certainly a lesson from this election and when you're talking specifically about climate change, a majority of americans say that they feel, this is according to gallup and pew, it's happening now, it's something that scientists
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)